Lettering

Hello!

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Some of my recent creative trials and explorations, all of which can be seen via the links above.

 

It’s been a while since writing any posts. However, despite this, I have been busy studying, drawing, making collages, lettering and, as ever, teaching. The blog will likely take on a more visual form from now on; populated with work and work-in-progress.

The site has had something of an overhaul. Nothing particularly slick, just a fresh theme, fewer pages and links and the addition of a Tumblr link as well as the Instagram feed. I want the site to have a more pared back look, and one that focuses a little more on my creative activity rather than those of others.

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Type Hunting

“Look!!! Typography!” #typeintheenvironment #typography #typeallaround #gravestone #graphics

A photo posted by Sancha de Burca (@sanchagdp) on

 

Yesterday we took our HND Graphic Design students out on a little typographic tour of their college town of Tonbridge. We wanted to stress the point that we spend our lives bombarded by messages and thousands of these are typographic. As such the purpose of the walk was to help enable students to reconnect with type at a more conscious level; thinking about its style, location, purpose, context, what it’s made of and whether or not it’s good or bad, etc.

As well as the usual high number of ugly plastic shop signage to be found in every high street we found some little gems, one of which was finding professional sign writer, Ollie Stone, at work in a local pub. It was perfect timing for us but I suspect Ollie was not expecting so much attention!

The images collected will form part of their research for a current poster project and next week we’re heading to Bexhill to gather more whilst visiting the De la Warr pavilion.

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#typography #gravestone #lettering #lettercutting #m #scriptlettering

A photo posted by Tim Bones (@mrtimbones) on

 

Typography e-book

Typography by Tim Bones

In the summer of 2014 I wrote series of blog posts for the Interactive Design Institute (IDI) on the theme of typography and typeface design. The posts are very much aimed at those wanting to gain an insight into the fundamentals of type and some of the approaches to its design. IDI have now collated these writings and put them into a nice little e-book which is available for all to read on Issuu.

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Lettering Workshop with Sean de Burca

Sean_de_Burca_Artwork

Sean de Burca is a former design student of West Kent College (University of Kent) who completed his graphic design degree with us several years ago. Since then Sean has established himself as a designer with a niche angle. As well as being an accomplished musician, producing the artwork for his own albums, Sean is gaining popularity as a designer with other musicians who are appear to want designs with a personal, more organic look rather than a slick, digital feel.

Sean’s work is meticulously crafted and our students had the pleasure of watching Sean deliver a talk and demonstration, during which the students emulated his approach. As someone who is familiar with a number of lettering techniques I can’t recall seeing an approach like this. The process that Sean has created and honed is one that allows him to work at an impressive speed given its intricacies.

Using this tried and tested method of creating lettering guides Sean then builds up his lettering in pencil adding any embellishments as required, and once satisfied with the drawing this is then taken into Illustrator for digital drawing and refining. Lastly the designs are further worked on within Photoshop where he can try a variety of treatments to obtain the right feel for the musician and their music.

It’s always fascinating to observe the subtle nuances of different lettering artists and once the students got to grips with Sean’s method of creating the lettering guides they soon became immersed in creating their own letters. As well as being interesting, some of the students are already considering how they might utilise this technique in their projects.

Sean’s artwork can be seen here.

K College Summer Shows 2014

O'Reilly's Whiskey flavoured drinks design by Jamie O'Reilley
O’Reilly’s Whiskey flavoured drinks design by Jamie O’Reilly

A
s ever the HND and BA (Hons) Graphic Design students of K College pulled off yet another another successful end of year show. The show was well attended and the feedback was great, with some students getting interviews for jobs and internships. Some of the work can be seen on our Pinterest page. One  of our BA students, Alex Greenhead, put together a good little review that cab be read here.

Well done to all and best of luck for the future.

Book of quotations by Liz Owen
Book of quotations by Liz Owen
students 2014
Some of this year’s student sensing the relief of a job well done!

shoe 2014

 

Lettering: Objects Examples Practice at The Letherby Gallery

Lettering

For those interested in type and lettering, a visit to the Letherby Gallery at Central St. Martin’s should be on the ‘to do’ list.  Along with some relatively recent work the “exhibition explores the rich history of lettering through a selection of key historic books and manuscripts from the college’s Museum & Study Collection and Central Lettering Record.”

Information can be found here.

Lettering St MartinsIMG_6974IMG_6985IMG_6987IMG_6998IMG_7006IMG_7007IMG_7012IMG_7015IMG_7018IMG_7019IMG_7028IMG_7039IMG_7041IMG_7047IMG_7054IMG_7058IMG_7063IMG_7066IMG_7070IMG_7073IMG_7075IMG_7077IMG_7088IMG_7096IMG_7110IMG_7128IMG_7136IMG_7152IMG_7153

 

 

The Lost Lettering of Robert Tressell?

The handy work of Robert Tressell?
The handy work of Robert Tressell?

Could this be the sign writing of Robert Tressell, author of the great socialist novel, The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists? According the media it could be. The lettering was revealed during the building’s restoration, and as you can see, it is in near perfect condition.

Tressell lived in and around the seaside town of Hastings in East Sussex and at least three of his dwellings there have commemorative plaques on them. He certainly wrote the manuscript for his posthumously published title whilst living in the Hastings area.

On looking at the lettering in Kings Road, St. Leonards, one can really get a feel for what many streets may have looked like with an array of hand rendered signs peppered throughout. The image below shows Kings Road in the Christmas of 1908, just three years before Tressell’s death from TB. The lettering attributed to Tressell is—and probably was then—visible just above where the little cart can be seen sitting on the right hand side of the road. Whether this is the work of Tressell or any other sign writer, my hope is that now this lettering has been exposed to the elements, Hastings Borough Council will help to ensure that these designs are kept in good repair for posterity.

Kings Road, St. Leonards in 1908.
Tressell's work in Kings Road
I wonder what Tressell would make of the shop signage in today’s Kings Road?

 

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